Casa San Blas Hotel Boutique Hotel en San Blas habitaciones en cusco

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PECULIAR STREETS IN CUSCO

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We invite you to discover the brief story behind seven streets with peculiar names in Cusco.

These streets are located in downtown Cusco and are easy to find.

While you enjoy your stay at Casa San Blas Boutique, hotel in Cusco, do not miss the opportunity to visit them.

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Calle Ataud (Coffin Street)

According to the chronicles of Cusco, the Inca General Atau Qilacu Yupanqui, whose conquests were legendary, inhabited the last house that can be seen from the beginning of this street. In the stone lintel of the same two snakes are carved in an attitude of attack.

During the colonial times, the street acquired that name due to its narrowness and gloomy appearance; as well as an urban legend that tells of a walking coffin that appeared on this street scaring pedestrians.

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Calle Purgatorio (Purgatory Street)C

Another urban legend gives name to this street. It is said that this was inhabited by an old grumpy woman who, even after death, roomed the house, letting shouts and chilling noises to the neighbors.

It is said that the son of the deceased used to place a box at the front door of the house with the label “a handout for the souls of purgatory”

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Calle Amargura (Bitterness Street)

This is a cobbled street, where it is said that the conquerors made the natives let the stones they took out from Sacsayhuaman roll for the construction of the Main Square and the Cathedral of Cusco. This work was hard and painful for the natives, who often suffered accidents. For this reason, the street was called “Mucchuicata” (in Qechua), which translated into Spanish means “BItterness Street”.

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Calle Afligidos (Afflicted Street)

This street is located next to what is now the Court House. It is said that formerly, in this street the bodies of the executed were exhibited, whose relatives made demonstrations of pain.

It is also said that many citizens in search of justice gathered in this place to tell their afflictions.

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Calle Mira Calcetas (Stocking Street)

This is the name of a narrow, small and poorly paved street where passers-by, especially women, make it difficult to walk.

It is said that formerly women had to pick up their long dresses to avoid tripping by allowing them not only to let other people see their socks (stockings) but also their calves, provoking roguish comments from the men.

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Calle Desamparados (Helpless Street)

In the mid-twentieth century, Mr. Alfonso Cortes Montoy, ordered to put on the lintel of the house where he lived, a small image of Our Lady of the Helpless, to whom he had a lot of devotion.

This image remained in place until the day of the great earthquake of the year 1950, remaining since that time only the name of the street.

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Calle Abracitos (Hugging Street)

It is said that Mr. Juan José Ricalde, upon making his triumphal entry into Cusco as the new Corregidor of the city, was welcomed with flowers. Two wealthy ladies in order to show their importance began throwing sealed and carved silver coins. One of these coins ended up slitting his head. The lady who caused such an accident hastened to apologize by hugging him repeatedly.

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At Casa San Blas Boutique we are proud of our culture and are ambassadors of our traditions and our genuine Peruvian hospitality.

Address Peru:
Tocuyeros 556 Cuesta de San Blas, Cusco - Peru
   
Telephone numbers:
From desk:  +51 84 237900
Reservations:  +51 84 254852
USA / Canada Toll Free:  +1 888 223 2806
USA / Canada:  +1 (720) 212 - 0761
   +1 (303) 578 - 1125

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